Sightings – Butterflies & Moths

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/10

Observation Time: 3:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: Females are dimorphic. The yellow morph differs from the male in having a blue postmedian area on the dorsal hindwing. In the dark morph, the areas that are normally yellow are replaced with dark gray or black.

More Information: Wikipedia

Tiger Swallowtail

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/17/13

Observation Time: 1:30 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road (back yard)

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: As I was picking raspberries in the garden, I saw this gorgeous butterfly, so I ran inside and grabbed my camera.

More Information: Wikipedia

Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/25/14

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: This butterfly posed nicely on a thistle blossom.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/26/11

Observation Time: 1:30 p.m.

Observation Location: dirt road leading to the Gavins Pond dam

Common Name:Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: This butterfly was so preoccupied with feeding on some decomposing organic matter that I was able to approach within a few inches to take this photo.

More Information: Butterflies and Moths of North America

Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly

Observer: Kurt Buermann

Observation Date: 7/28/17

Observation Time: N/A

Observation Location: In our yard (Furnace Street) on a spicebush shrub

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: fairly common large butterfly

More Information: Butterflies and Moths of North America

Observer: Kurt Buermann

Observation Date: 7/31/16

Observation Time: N/A

Observation Location: Furnace Street

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: A common butterfly whose range stretches along the entire U.S. Atlantic coast and as far west as Texas. Having the ability to utilize a number of host plants and habitats this species does well and is not threatened.

More Information: Wikipedia
eastern tiger swallowtail 7-31-2016

Observer: Amy Waters

Observation Date: 9/2/08

Observation Location:

Common Name: Unicorn Caterpillar

Scientific Name: Schizura unicornis

Comments: This Unicorn Caterpillar may have crawled off a blueberry bush. It also likes hickory, birch, maple, cherry, oak, sweet pepperbush, witch hazel, and many more woody shrubs and trees. Its range is from Canada to Florida and Texas. It will turn into a moth. Its family is Prominents – Notodontidae.

More Information: University of Missouri

Unicorn Caterpillar

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/21/10

Observation Time: 8:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Viceroy Butterfly

Scientific Name: Limenitis archippus

Comments: Smaller than a monarch, with a characteristic black line across the hind wings.

More Information: NatureWorks

Viceroy Butterfly

Observer: Zahava Friedman

Observation Date: 6/22/20

Observation Time: 10:40 a.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Viceroy butterfly

Scientific Name: Limenitis archippus

Comments: Viceroys are smaller than the famous migrating monarchs, and the black markings are different. Note the curved black line on the hind wings. Monarchs do not have this line.

Viceroys are brush-footed butterflies, which have tiny, hairy forelegs that look more like brushes than feet and are not used for walking.

More Information: NatureWorks

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/17/13

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area near soccer parking area

Common Name: Viceroy butterfly

Scientific Name: Limenitis archippus

Comments: This butterfly is smaller than the famous migrating monarchs, and the black markings are different. Note the black line on the hind wings. Monarchs do not have this line.

More Information: NatureWorks

Viceroy Butterfly