Sightings – Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/23

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Magnolia Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga magnolia

Comments: These gorgeous little birds pass through Sharon in early May on their northward migration. Learn to recognize their song to improve your chances of seeing one early on a clear morning at the end of April or in early May.

The end of its tail looks like it was dipped in black paint. This is a distinguishing feature of magnolia warblers.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/24/18

Observation Time: 8:10 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Magnolia Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga magnolia

Comments: Magnolia warblers are striking birds, but they are hard to photograph because they don’t hold still. Warblers migrate through Sharon in late April through May, feeding primarily on insects and spiders to maintain their strength for the long flight north. After the leaves come out, warblers are especially hard to see up in the trees. You can find them easier if you memorize their respective songs.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/19

Observation Time: 7:55 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Magnolia Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga magnolia

Comments: Warblers are like jewels in the woods. I was very lucky to get this shot, but those who spend time looking around outdoors, especially on sunny mornings in early May, are treated to sightings like this once in a while.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 1/20/10

Observation Time: 3:55 p.m.

Observation Location: Knifeshop Pond, Ames Street

Common Name: Mallard

Scientific Name: Anas platyrhynchos

Comments: The Mallard is a rare example of both Allen’s Rule and Bergmann’s Rule in birds. Bergmann’s Rule, which states that polar forms tend to be larger than related ones from warmer climates, has numerous examples in birds. Allen’s Rule says that appendages like ears tend to be smaller in polar forms to minimize heat loss, and larger in tropical and desert equivalents to facilitate heat diffusion, and that the polar taxa are stockier overall. Examples of this rule in birds are rare, as they lack external ears. However, the bill of ducks is very well supplied with blood vessels and is vulnerable to cold.

The size of the Mallard varies clinally, and birds from Greenland, although larger than birds further south, have smaller bills and are stockier. It is sometimes separated as subspecies Greenland Mallard.

-Source: Wikipedia

More Information: All About Birds

Mallard

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 8/28/20

Observation Time: 12:00 p.m.

Observation Location: near intersection of Beach & Harding Streets

Common Name: Mallard

Scientific Name: Anas platyrhynchos

Comments: Perhaps the most familiar of all ducks, Mallards occur throughout North America and Eurasia in ponds and parks as well as wilder wetlands and estuaries. The male’s gleaming green head, gray flanks, and black tail-curl arguably make it the most easily identified duck. Mallards have long been hunted for the table, and almost all domestic ducks come from this species.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/13/19

Observation Time: 7:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Mourning Dove

Scientific Name: Zenaida macroura

Comments: The mourning dove is one of the most abundant and widespread of all North American bird species. It is also a leading gamebird, with more than 20 million birds (up to 70 million in some years) shot annually in the U.S., both for sport and for meat. Its ability to sustain its population under such pressure is due to its prolific breeding; in warm areas, one pair may raise up to six broods of two young each in a single year.

More Information: Wikipedia or All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/15/20

Observation Time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: parking area by Lake Massapoag boat ramp

Common Name: Mourning Dove

Scientific Name: Zenaida macroura

Comments: The mourning dove is one of the most abundant and widespread of all North American bird species. It is also a leading gamebird, with more than 20 million birds (up to 70 million in some years) shot annually in the U.S., both for sport and for meat. Its ability to sustain its population under such pressure is due to its prolific breeding; in warm areas, one pair may raise up to six broods of two young each in a single year.

More Information: Wikipedia or All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/19

Observation Time: 1:10 p.m.

Observation Location: beneath the high tension wires that parallel So. Walpole St.

Common Name: Mourning Dove

Scientific Name: Zenaida macroura

Comments: The mourning dove is one of the most abundant and widespread of all North American bird species. It is also a leading gamebird, with more than 20 million birds (up to 70 million in some years) shot annually in the U.S., both for sport and for meat. Its ability to sustain its population under such pressure is due to its prolific breeding; in warm areas, one pair may raise up to six broods of two young each in a single year.

More Information: Wikipedia or All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/2/10

Observation Time: 8:40 a.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Mourning Dove

Scientific Name: Zenaida macroura

Comments: The mourning dove is one of the most abundant and widespread of all North American bird species. It is also a leading gamebird, with more than 20 million birds (up to 70 million in some years) shot annually in the U.S., both for sport and for meat. Its ability to sustain its population under such pressure is due to its prolific breeding; in warm areas, one pair may raise up to six broods of two young each in a single year.

More Information: Wikipedia or All About Birds

Mourning Dove

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 1/20/10

Observation Time: 3:55 p.m.

Observation Location: on the ice at Knifeshop Pond, Ames Street

Common Name: Muscovy Duck

Scientific Name: Cairina moschata

Comments: The Muscovy Duck is a large duck native to Mexico and Central and South America. A small wild population reaches into the United States in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. There also are feral breeding populations in North America in and around public parks in nearly every state of the USA and in the Canadian provinces; feral populations also exist in Europe. Although the Muscovy Duck is a tropical bird, it adapts to icy and snowy conditions down to –12°C (10°F) and below without ill effects. — Wikipedia

More Information: Avian Web

Muscovy Duck

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 10/21/14

Observation Time: 5:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Mute Swan

Scientific Name: Cygnus olor

Comments: Swans are powerful birds that will attack humans if they feel threatened. Don’t allow your children to approach them.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deborah Radovsky

Observation Date: 11/25/18

Observation Time: 3:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag

Common Name: Mute Swan

Scientific Name: Cygnus olor

Comments: juveniles (4) and adults. These graceful birds are native to Eurasia. They were introduced in North America in the late 19th century, and are now common here. Beware! Swans can be aggressive. They may attack if they feel threatened.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 3/5/20

Observation Time: 3:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag (south end, off Beach St.)

Common Name: Mute Swan

Scientific Name: Cygnus olor

Comments: I saw five of these guys cruising by the lake. Sorry, no photo.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Yujie Hu

Observation Date: 3/25/09

Observation Time: 4:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Saw Mill Pond

Common Name: Mute Swan

Scientific Name: Cygnus olor

Comments: Our two sons spotted these two swans on the pond behind our back yard, and they have stayed for about a week; we hope they will make it their home.

For more information about the pros and cons of swans, see: Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection

Mute Swans

Mute Swans

Mute Swans

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/23

Observation Time: 6:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Nashville Warbler

Scientific Name: Leiothlypis ruficapilla

Comments: Nashville Warblers don’t breed anywhere near Nashville, Tennessee, although they do migrate through. The species got its name because Nashville was where Alexander Wilson first saw it in 1811, and went on to name it.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/3/24

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Nashville Warbler

Scientific Name: Leiothlypis ruficapilla

Comments: It’s hard to get a good photo of a small bird in the top of a tall tree, especially on a cloudy day when the light is dim, but at least the bird in this photo is identifiable as a Nashville warbler.

Nashville Warblers don’t breed anywhere near Nashville, Tennessee, although they do migrate through there. The species got its name because Nashville was where Alexander Wilson first saw it in 1811, and went on to name it.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 11/19/12

Observation Time: 10:25 a.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Northern Cardinal

Scientific Name: Cardinalis cardinalis

Comments: Cardinals are seen year-round in Sharon. In springtime they defend their territories, sometimes hurling themselves against glass windows when they see their own reflections, thinking it’s a competitor.

More Information: All About Birds

Cardinal

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 11/27/20

Observation Time: 12:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Rd. (my back yard)

Common Name: Northern Cardinal

Scientific Name: Cardinalis cardinalis

Comments: One of the most common birds in Sharon, cardinals have a whistle-like voice, and sing strongly. Learn to recognize their various vocalizations at: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/northern_cardinal/sound

Cardinals typically travel in pairs. The male is bright red and the female is mostly tan.

More Information: All About Birds

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 12/18/20

Observation Time: 8:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Rd. (our back yard)

Common Name: Northern Cardinal (female)

Scientific Name: Cardinalis cardinalis

Comments: One of the most common birds in Sharon, cardinals have a whistle-like voice, and sing strongly. Learn to recognize their various vocalizations at: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/northern_cardinal/sound

Cardinals typically travel in pairs. The male is bright red and the female is mostly tan.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/27/24

Observation Time: 4:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Northern Cardinal

Scientific Name: Cardinalis cardinalis

Comments: One of the most common birds in Sharon, cardinals have a whistle-like voice, and sing strongly. Learn to recognize their various vocalizations at: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/northern_cardinal/sound

Cardinals typically travel in pairs. The male is bright red and the female is mostly tan.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/5/18

Observation Time: 7:25 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Cardinal

Scientific Name: Cardinalis cardinalis

Comments: One of the most common birds in Sharon, cardinals have a whistle-like voice, and sing strongly. Learn to recognize their various vocalizations at: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/northern_cardinal/sound

Cardinals typically travel in pairs. The female is mostly tan.

More Information: All About Birds

male:

female:

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/14

Observation Time: 7:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Cardinal

Scientific Name: Cardinalis cardinalis

Comments: One of the most common birds in Sharon, cardinals have a whistle-like voice, and sing strongly. Learn to recognize their various vocalizations at: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/northern_cardinal/sound

Cardinals typically travel in pairs. The female is mostly tan.

More Information: All About Birds

Northern Cardinal

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 8/22/20

Observation Time: 5:00 p.m.

Observation Location: near intersection of Beach & Harding Streets

Common Name: Northern Cardinal (male)

Scientific Name: Cardinalis cardinalis

Comments: One of the most common birds in Sharon, cardinals are also one of the most striking. Cardinals have a whistle-like voice, and sing strongly. Learn to recognize their various vocalizations at: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/northern_cardinal/sound

Cardinals typically travel in pairs. The female is mostly tan.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Rick Dumont

Observation Date: 3/21/09

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Backyard near Bay Road

Common Name: Northern Flicker

Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus

Comments: Love the coloring…

If you learn to recognize the distinctive call of the flicker, you will hear them frequently in wooded areas.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Flicker

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/15/20

Observation Time: 2:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land near Sandy Ridge Circle

Common Name: Northern Flicker

Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus

Comments: Flickers are woodpeckers, but they are unusual in that they eat ants and beetles on the ground. They are sometimes called yellow-shafted flickers. 

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/28/24

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Flicker

Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus

Comments: Flickers are woodpeckers, but they are unusual in that they eat ants and beetles on the ground. They are sometimes called yellow-shafted flickers because of the yellow feathers on the underside of their tails.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/15/20

Observation Time: 9:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land near Lakeview & Morse Sts.

Common Name: Northern Flicker

Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus

Comments: Flickers are woodpeckers, but they are unusual in that they eat ants and beetles on the ground. They are sometimes called yellow-shafted flickers.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/19/19

Observation Time: 7:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Flicker

Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus

Comments: Flickers are woodpeckers, but they are unusual in that they eat ants and beetles on the ground. They are sometimes called yellow-shafted flickers. The last photo below shows the yellow feathers on the underside of its tail. This individual was nesting in a hole high in a dead tree nearby.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/22/16

Observation Time: N/A

Observation Location: Paul Revere Rd., Sharon

Common Name: Northern Flicker

Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus

Comments: Although it can climb up the trunks of trees and hammer on wood like other woodpeckers, the Northern Flicker prefers to find food on the ground. Ants are its main food, and the flicker digs in the dirt to find them. It uses its long barbed tongue to lap up the ants.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/11

Observation Time: 2:35 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Northern Flicker

Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus

Comments: This northern flicker was injured, perhaps as a result of a hawk attack.

The Northern Flicker is part of the genus Colaptes which encompasses 12 New-World woodpeckers. There are two living and one extinct subspecies of C. auratus species. The existing sub-species were at one time considered separate species but they commonly interbreed where ranges overlap and are now considered one species by the American Ornithologists Union. Whether or not they are separate species is a well-known example of the species problem.

The Yellow-shafted Flicker Colaptes auratus resides in eastern North America. They are yellow under the tail and underwings and have yellow shafts on their primaries. They have a grey cap, a beige face and a red bar at the nape of their neck. Males have a black moustache. Colaptes comes from the Greek verb colapt, to peck. Auratus is from the Latin root aurat, meaning “gold” or “golden” and refers to the bird’s underwing coloration.

Under the name “Yellowhammer” it is the state bird of Alabama.

The Red-shafted Flicker Colaptes auratus cafer resides in western North America. They are red under the tail and underwings and have red shafts on their primaries. They have a beige cap and a grey face. Males have a red moustache. The scientific name, Colaptes auratus cafer, is the result of an error made in 1788 by the German systematist, Johann Gmelin, who believed that its original habitat was in South Africa among the Xhosa people, then known as the “Kaffir” people. (The term “Kaffir” is now considered an extreme ethnic slur in South Africa.)

The Guadalupe Flicker Colaptes auratus/cafer rufipileus extinct c. 1910.

From Wikipedia

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Flicker

Flicker

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/9/13

Observation Time: 3:55 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Northern Flicker

Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus

Comments: Flickers are woodpeckers, but they are unusual in that they eat ants and beetles on the ground.

More Information: All About Birds

Flicker

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/24/11

Observation Time: 10:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Northern Flicker (fledgling)

Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus

Comments: This fledgling Northern Flicker was on the ground at first, but it hopped over to a tamarack tree and climbed up, pecking from time to time under the bark and calling repeatedly as if it wanted its mother.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Flicker Fledgling

Flicker Fledgling

Flicker Fledgling

Flicker Fledgling

Flicker Fledgling

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/2/11

Observation Time: 4:50 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Northern mockingbird

Scientific Name: Mimus polyglottos

Comments: As both the common name and the scientific name suggest, the northern mockingbird mimics other birds and other sounds in its environment. If you are familiar with bird songs, you can sometimes get clues about what other bird species might be around by listening to a mockingbird.

More Information: All About Birds

Northern Mockingbird

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/6/10

Observation Time: 4:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Northern mockingbird

Scientific Name: Mimus polyglottos

Comments: Mockingbirds repeat whatever they are mocking 3 or 4 times. That differentiates them from the other two mimics found in Sharon, brown thrashers (that repeat twice), and catbirds (that repeat only once).

More Information: All About Birds

Northern Mockingbird

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/7/23

Observation Time: 8:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Parula Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga americana

Comments: Northern parula warblers pass through Sharon in late April and early May on their northward migration. They are typically seen high in the trees, so it helps to look for them at the end of April and the beginning of May before the leaves have fully emerged. An app called Merlin is very helpful for finding out what species of birds are singing nearby.

You can monitor the bird migration in spring by keeping an eye on the live radar map at: http://birdcast.info/live-migration-maps/

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/23

Observation Time: 9:05 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Parula Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga americana

Comments: Northern parula warblers pass through Sharon in late April and early May on their northward migration. They are typically seen high in the trees, so it helps to look for them at the end of April and the beginning of May before the leaves have fully emerged. An app called Merlin is very helpful for finding out what species of birds are singing nearby.

You can monitor the bird migration in spring by keeping an eye on the live radar map at: http://birdcast.info/live-migration-maps/

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Vin Zollo

Observation Date: 10/16/22

Observation Time: nighttime

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Center

Common Name: Northern Saw-whet Owl

Scientific Name: Aegolius acadicus

Comments: This bird was captured as part of a banding program to learn more about this common owl, which is seldom seen because it is nocturnal.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 10/11/09

Observation Time: 4:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Northern Shoveler duck

Scientific Name: Anas clypeata

Comments: This duck gets its name from its large bill.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Northern Shoveler Duck

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/23/24

Observation Time: 7:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Waterthrush

Scientific Name: Parkesia noveboracensis

Comments: The northern waterthrush is actually a type of warbler. It looks a lot like an ovenbird, which is also a type of warbler. This one was seen along the boardwalk through the wetlands at Moose Hill.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/1/18

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Waterthrush

Scientific Name: Parkesia noveboracensis

Comments: The northern waterthrush is actually a type of warbler. It looks a lot like an ovenbird, which is also a warbler. This one was seen near the boardwalk through the wetlands at Moose Hill.

More Information: All About Birds


Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/18

Observation Time: 12:50

Observation Location: meadow at Morse and Lakeview

Common Name: Northern Waterthrush

Scientific Name: Parkesia noveboracensis

Comments: The northern waterthrush is actually a type of warbler. It looks a lot like an ovenbird, which is also a warbler. This one was seen in the town-owned meadow at the junction of Morse and Lakeview Streets.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/16

Observation Time: 9:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Waterthrush

Scientific Name: Parkesia noveboracensis

Comments: A bird of northern forests, the Northern Waterthrush is in the warbler family. It sings its loud, ringing song from wooded swamps, bogs and streams. It migrates through Sharon in spring and fall, bobbing its tail in the woods near water.

More Information: All About Birds

Northern waterthrush

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/2/24

Observation Time: 7:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Waterthrush

Scientific Name: Parkesia noveboracensis

Comments: The northern waterthrush is actually a type of warbler. It looks a lot like an ovenbird, which is also a type of warbler. This one was seen along the boardwalk through the wetlands at Moose Hill.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/23

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Waterthrush

Scientific Name: Parkesia noveboracensis

Comments: The northern waterthrush is actually a type of warbler. It looks a lot like an ovenbird, which is also a warbler. This one was seen along the boardwalk through the wetlands at Moose Hill.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/5/23

Observation Time: 7:25 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Waterthrush

Scientific Name: Parkesia noveboracensis

Comments: The northern waterthrush is actually a type of warbler. It looks a lot like an ovenbird, which is also a warbler. This one was seen along the boardwalk through the wetlands at Moose Hill.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/16/20

Observation Time: 6:45 a.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Olive-sided flycatcher

Scientific Name: Contopus cooperi

Comments: I encountered this bird perched about 30 feet up in a leafless tree on the right side of the trail leading from the soccer fields to Gavins Pond dam, where the trail emerges from the woods and bends left toward the dam.

The white patches were quite distinctive and caught my eye immediately as I approached from a distance. I was astonished to see this bird, as I had never seen anything before in Sharon with such dramatic white patches. It seemed to me as if such eye-catching white patches might be an evolutionary disadvantage because they would be noticeable to hawks and other predators.
Speaking of predators, I saw what I think was a weasel or a mink in the bushes near the far left corner of the inner soccer field parking lot. It was surprisingly small – about 10” to 12” long I’d say. Unfortunately I did not get a photo of it as it scampered away.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Michael Scutari Acciavatti  

Observation Date: 12/6/2018

Observation Location: Prescott Pond, Lakwood Drive, Stoughton

Common Name: Osprey

Scientific Name: Pandion haliaetus

Comments: Ospreys can also be seen in Sharon. They are most commonly seen over a lake or pond, where they dive for fish.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/21

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: tall cell tower by the composting area at the end of Farnham Road

Common Name: Osprey

Scientific Name: Pandion haliaetus

Comments: A pair of ospreys built a nest atop the tall cell tower by the composting area at the end of Farnham Road.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/16

Observation Time: 7:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Center

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: Ovenbirds are in the warbler family. Their insistent “teacher, teacher, teacher” call is one of the most commonly heard birdsongs in the woods around Sharon. They are called ovenbirds because their nests, which are built on the ground, resemble little ovens.

More Information: All About Birds 

Ovenbird8

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/13/19

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: This is one of the most common birds in the woods at Moose Hill. Learn to recognize its song, an insistent, piercing ‘tea-Cher, tea-Cher, tea-CHER, Tea-CHER, TEA-CHER’, and you will be able to find them.

Ovenbirds are warblers. Their name comes from the mounded nest they build on the ground, which resembles an oven.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 5/14/23

Observation Time: 12:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Parkway

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: This is one of the most common birds in the woods at Moose Hill. Learn to recognize its song, an insistent, piercing ‘tea-Cher, tea-Cher, tea-CHER, Tea-CHER, TEA-CHER’, and you will be able to find them.

Ovenbirds are warblers. Their name comes from the mounded nest they build on the ground, which resembles an oven.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/15/23

Observation Time: 10:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: This is one of the most common birds in the woods at Moose Hill. Learn to recognize its song, an insistent, piercing ‘tea-Cher, tea-Cher, tea-CHER, Tea-CHER, TEA-CHER’, and you will be able to find them.

Ovenbirds are warblers. Their name comes from the mounded nest they build on the ground, which resembles an oven.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/16/14

Observation Time: 6:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: The ovenbird’s rapid-fire “teacher-teacher-teacher” song rings out in summer hardwood forests from the Mid-Atlantic states to northeastern British Columbia. It’s so loud that it may come as a surprise to find this inconspicuous warbler strutting like a tiny rooster across the dim forest floor. Its olive-brown back and spotted breast are excellent disguise as it gleans invertebrates from the leaf litter. Its nest, a leaf-covered dome resembling an old-fashioned outdoor oven, gives the ovenbird its name.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/16

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Center

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: Ovenbirds are in the warbler family. Their insistent “teacher, teacher, teacher” call is one of the most commonly heard birdsongs in the woods around Sharon. They are called ovenbirds because their nests, which are built on the ground, resemble little ovens.

More Information: All About Birds 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/15

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: woods beyond Everett Street

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: Ovenbirds are in the warbler family. Their insistent “teacher, teacher, teacher” call is one of the most commonly heard birdsongs in the woods around Sharon. They are called ovenbirds because their nests, which are built on the ground, resemble little ovens.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Jason Platt

Observation Date: 5/8/18

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: The ovenbird’s rapid-fire “teacher-teacher-teacher” song rings out in summer hardwood forests from the Mid-Atlantic states to northeastern British Columbia. It’s so loud that it may come as a surprise to find this inconspicuous warbler strutting like a tiny rooster across the dim forest floor. Its olive-brown back and spotted breast are excellent disguise as it gleans invertebrates from the leaf litter. Its nest, a leaf-covered dome resembling an old-fashioned outdoor oven, gives the ovenbird its name.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/19

Observation Time: 11:13 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: This is one of the most common birds in the woods at Moose Hill. Learn to recognize its song, an insistent and loud ‘tea-Cher, tea-Cher, tea-CHER, Tea-CHER, TEA-CHER’, and you will be able to find them.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/3/20

Observation Time: 6:51 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary (Billings Loop)

Common Name: Palm Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga palmarum

Comments: Palm warblers pass through Sharon in late April and early May on their northward migration. They sometimes mingle with other species of warblers.
You can monitor the bird migration in spring by keeping an eye on the live radar map at: http://birdcast.info/live-migration-maps/

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/3/20

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: pine woods by Gavins Pond

Common Name: Palm Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga palmarum

Comments: Palm warblers pass through Sharon in late April and early May on their northward migration. They sometimes mingle with other species of warblers. This one was in the company of a yellow-rumped warbler and a black-and-white warbler.
You can monitor the bird migration in spring by keeping an eye on the live radar map at: http://birdcast.info/live-migration-maps/

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/7/23

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Palm Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga palmarum

Comments: Palm warblers pass through Sharon in late April and early May on their northward migration. They sometimes mingle with other species of warblers. This one was in the company of a northern parula warbler and a black-and-white warbler.

You can monitor the bird migration in spring by keeping an eye on the live radar map at: http://birdcast.info/live-migration-maps/

An app called Merlin is very helpful for finding out what species of birds are singing nearby.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/9/23

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Palm Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga palmarum

Comments: Palm warblers pass through Sharon in late April and early May on their northward migration. May 9 is near the end of the time during which palm warblers can be seen in Sharon.

You can monitor the bird migration in spring by keeping an eye on the live radar map at: http://birdcast.info/live-migration-maps/

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Colin Barbera

Observation Date: 12/11/21

Observation Time: afternoon

Observation Location: Tolman St.

Common Name: Peregrine falcon

Scientific Name: Falco peregrinus

Comments: “Powerful and fast-flying, the Peregrine Falcon hunts medium-sized birds, dropping down on them from high above in a spectacular stoop. They were virtually eradicated from eastern North America by pesticide poisoning in the middle 20th century. After significant recovery efforts, Peregrine Falcons have made an incredible rebound and are now regularly seen in many large cities and coastal areas.”
 – from: All About Birds

(Thank you, Rachel Carson, for ending the use of DDT!)

More Information: All About Birds and Audubon

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/14

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Phoebe

Scientific Name: Sayornis phoebe

Comments: The song of the Phoebe sounds like its name. You can find and play bird songs online. The more bird calls you memorize, the more bird species you will be able to identify in the field, where the birds themselves are often concealed by foliage.

More Information: All About Birds

Phoebe

Observer: Jason Platt

Observation Date: 5/8/18

Observation Time: 8:15 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Phoebe

Scientific Name: Sayornis phoebe

Comments: One of our most familiar eastern flycatchers, the Eastern Phoebe’s raspy “phoebe” call is a frequent sound around yards and farms in spring and summer.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/23

Observation Time: 11:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Phoebe

Scientific Name: Sayornis phoebe

Comments: Phoebes are members of the flycatcher family. The song of the Phoebe sounds like its name. You can find and play bird songs online. The more bird calls you memorize, the more bird species you will be able to identify in the field, where the birds themselves are often concealed by foliage.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/1/10

Observation Time: 7:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road soccer field

Common Name: Phoebe

Scientific Name: Sayornis phoebe

Comments: Phoebes are flycatchers.

More Information: All About Birds

Phoebe

Observer: Faith Berkland

Observation Date: 10/24/20

Observation Time: 3:55 p.m.

Observation Location: 302-296 Mansfield St., Sharon

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: Unfortunately I did not get a picture. However, this was very recognizable for the loud call, the large white spot under its wings when it flew from tree to tree and its pointy crest. I only briefly made out the coloring of its crest but unmistakable nonetheless. Much larger than the other woodpeckers in the area, flickers, red bellies, downy, hairy etc.

More Information: Audubon Guide to N. American Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 2/25/20

Observation Time: 1:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: I spotted this magnificent, large, red-crested woodpecker behind the barn on the Billings Loop. You will improve your chances of sighting one of these birds by learning their calls and the sound of their drumming, which is different from that of other smaller woodpeckers.

More Information: Audubon Guide to N. American Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/21/24

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: You will improve your chances of sighting one of these magnificent birds by learning their calls and the sound of their drumming, which is different from that of other smaller woodpeckers.

More Information: Audubon Guide to N. American Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/27/18

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: This large woodpecker (about the size of a crow) was peeling bark off a tree to get at the bugs underneath. Its tongue is visible in the last photo below.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/19

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: I found this bird by following the sound of its hammering. It was in the exact same location as it was on May 7, 2019. Shortly after I took this photo, I saw it mate with another pileated woodpecker.

More Information: Audubon Guide to N. American Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/17/23

Observation Time: 8:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: I heard this magnificent, large, red-crested woodpecker before I saw it near a dead tree where it had hollowed out a nesting cavity. I watched and photographed it as it made its way to the nest, went in, and then re-emerged.

You will improve your chances of sighting one of these birds by learning their calls and the sound of their drumming, which is different from that of other smaller woodpeckers.

More Information: Audubon Guide to N. American Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/3/24

Observation Time: 7:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: You will improve your chances of sighting one of these magnificent raven-size woodpeckers by learning their calls and the sound of their drumming, which is different from that of other smaller woodpeckers.

More Information: Audubon Guide to N. American Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/7/19

Observation Time: 7:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: This magnificent crow-sized bird was the inspiration for the cartoon character Woody Woodpecker. Unfortunately, its cousin, the ivory-billed woodpecker, has gone extinct.

More Information: Audubon Guide to N. American Birds

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/9/23

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments:  You will improve your chances of sighting one of these magnificent birds by learning their calls and the sound of their drumming, which is different from that of other smaller woodpeckers.

You can use a cell phone app called Merlin to detect and identify nearby birds. It’s a great way to learn bird songs.

More Information: Audubon Guide to N. American Birds