Sightings – Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/25/23

Observation Time: 8:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pine Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus

Comments: Pine warblers are typically found in pine groves. Many warbler species migrate through Sharon in May on their way to nesting areas farther north, but pine warblers nest here in Sharon, and can be found here all summer. Although they typically migrate south in winter, some of them stick around in Massachusetts through the winter.

The trilling call of the pine warbler can be hard to distinguish from that of a chipping sparrow.

More Information: Mass Audubon

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/26/24

Observation Time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm

Common Name: Pine Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus

Comments: Pine warblers are typically found in pine groves. Many warbler species migrate through Sharon in late April and May on their way to nesting areas farther north, but pine warblers nest here in Sharon, and can be found in the woods all summer. Although they typically migrate south in winter, some of them hang around in Massachusetts through the winter.

The trilling call of the pine warbler can be hard to distinguish from that of a chipping sparrow, but that can be accomplished with the assistance of cell phone apps such as Merlin that can help identify nearby birds based on their singing.

More Information: Mass Audubon

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/2/20

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road (my back yard)

Common Name: Pine Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus

Comments: Pine warblers are typically found in pine groves. Many warbler species migrate through Sharon in May on their way to nesting areas farther north, but pine warblers nest here in Sharon, and can be found here all summer.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: May 24, 2015

Observation Time: 5:20 p.m.

Observation Location: along Beaver Brook near the train station

Common Name: Pine Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus

Comments: Notice that this pine warbler is in a pine tree. Many warbler species migrate through Sharon in May on their way to nesting areas farther north, but pine warblers nest here in Sharon, and can be found in summer.

More Information: All About Birds

Pine warbler5

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: May 27, 2019

Observation Time: 1:55 p.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land near Morse & Lakeview

Common Name: Pine Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus

Comments: Pine warblers nest here in Sharon, and can be found in pine woods in summer. The song of the pine warbler is hard to distinguish from the song of the chipping sparrow – unless you are a pine warbler!

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/31/14

Observation Time: 5:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Trail through woods beside Gavins Pond

Common Name: Pine warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus

Comments: The song of the pine warbler is hard to distinguish from the reedy trill of a chipping sparrow.

More Information: All About Birds

Pine Warbler

Pine Warbler

Pine Warbler

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/22/23

Observation Time: 12:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Pine Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus

Comments: Pine warblers are typically found in pine groves. Many warbler species migrate through Sharon in May on their way to nesting areas farther north, but pine warblers nest here in Sharon, and can be found in the woods all summer. Although they typically migrate south in winter, some of them hang around in Massachusetts through the winter.

The trilling call of the pine warbler can be hard to distinguish from that of a chipping sparrow, but that can be accomplished with the assistance of cell phone apps such as Merlin that can help identify nearby birds based on their singing.

More Information: Mass Audubon

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/20

Observation Time: 10:50 a.m.

Observation Location: under the power lines across the street from the Gavins Pond soccer fields

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are found in scrubby fields and forest edges throughout the eastern and south-central United States. Unlike many other warblers that migrate through Sharon in spring and fall, the prairie warbler hangs around all summer. You can find them in brushy areas under power lines, especially if you learn to recognize their ascending trill. This habitat is also good for indigo buntings.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/12/18

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR), Powerline Trail

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: The Prairie Warbler is found in scrubby fields and forests throughout the eastern and south-central United States, not on the prairies. Unlike many other warblers that migrate through Sharon in spring and fall, the Prairie Warbler hangs around all summer.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/18/20

Observation Time: 10:25 a.m.

Observation Location: under the power lines across the street from the Gavins Pond soccer fields

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are found in scrubby fields and forest edges throughout the eastern and south-central United States. Unlike many other warblers that migrate through Sharon in spring and fall, the prairie warbler hangs around all summer. You can find them in brushy areas under power lines, especially if you learn to recognize their ascending trill. This habitat is also good for indigo buntings.

Note the reddish patch on its back.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/22/15

Observation Time: 4:20 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophagia discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers can be found in unforested areas such as those under the high-tension lines. I encountered this one in a field near Gavins Pond. If you learn to recognize their song, you will find them much easier.

More Information: All About Birds

Prairie Warbler5

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/14

Observation Time: 5:15 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Prairie warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are typically found in open fields and under power lines. Listen for their ascending trill.

More Information: All About Birds

Prairie Warbler

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/28/23

Observation Time: 11:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR) – under the power lines

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are found in scrubby fields and forest edges throughout the eastern and south-central United States. Unlike many other warblers that migrate through Sharon in spring and fall, the prairie warbler nests in Sharon and hangs around all summer. You can find them in brushy areas under power lines, especially if you learn to recognize their ascending trill. This habitat is also good for indigo buntings.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/4/24

Observation Time: 11:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR) – under the power lines

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are found in scrubby fields and forest edges throughout the eastern and south-central United States. Unlike many other warblers that migrate through Sharon in spring and fall, the prairie warbler nests in Sharon and stays around all summer. You can find them in brushy areas under power lines, especially if you learn to recognize their ascending trill. This habitat is also a good place to look for indigo buntings in spring and summer.

More information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/6/15

Observation Time: 3:25 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: This striking yellow and black warbler has a high-pitched trill that ascends. It can be seen in open fields and under power lines all summer in Sharon.

More Information: All About Birds

Warbler

 

Observer: Jason Platt

Observation Date: 5/8/18

Observation Time: 8:30 a.m.

Observation Location: under power lines at Moose Hill

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: This striking yellow and black warbler has a high-pitched trill that ascends. It can be seen in open fields and under power lines all summer in Sharon.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/17/13

Observation Time: 4:30 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Prairie warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are not hard to find in fields and cleared areas under high tension lines in Sharon from May to August. Listen for their ascending trill.

More Information: All About Birds

Prairie Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/19

Observation Time: 1:20 p.m.

Observation Location: on the bluff beneath the power lines that parallel So. Walpole St.

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are found in scrubby fields and forests throughout the eastern and south-central United States, not on the prairies. Unlike many other warblers that migrate through Sharon in spring and fall, the Prairie Warbler hangs around all summer. You can find them in brushy areas under power lines, especially if you learn to recognize their ascending trill.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 6/25/11

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Purple Finch

Scientific Name: Carpodacus purpureus

Comments: Probably decreased in Northeast in late 19th century after introduction of House Sparrow. In recent decades has declined further in that area, possibly owing to competition with House Finch.

More Information: audubon.org or All About Birds

Purple Finch

Observer: Rebecca Hickman

Observation Date: 7/17/12

Observation Time: n/a

Observation Location: Back yard

Common Name: Rabbit, Hawk, and Turkeys

Scientific Name: n/a

Comments: This past week, beginning last weekend, has been like watching an episode of National Geograhpic in my back yard. I’m exaggerating, but not by much..

I enjoy watching the little bunny that has taken up residency under our shed in our back yard.. I’m outside a lot, and I see him munching clover all the time.

Sunday morning I was outside having my morning cup of joe, and watching the bunny hop around on the freshly mowed lawn. Just then, what I’m assuming was a hawk came and snatched him. It happened so suddenly! At first I gasped and weakly yelled “no!” as the big bird of prey flew off with the fluffy guy. The area beyond our back yard is heavily wooded, and the trees are very tall so much of the aerial view is obscured by them and I didn’t see much more. I would have known it was a hawk with more certainty if I saw it flying more. My only good view of him was by the back of his wings when he came down, and took off. It was sad to see the bunny go, but mostly it was an amazing thing to see and I’m glad I got too see such a moment in person.

Then, yesterday I went outside to grill some hot dogs and there were two big turkeys in the yard. I grabbed my toddler and brought him out for a peek, but I knew to stay close to the safety of the door. I know from past experience that turkeys can be aggressive. The experience was when my curiousity brought me close to a pack of turkeys while I was driving in Scituate. The turkeys charged and gobble- gobbled and attacked the tires of our mini van. I was so startled that I told my husband to lock the doors. I started laughing at the silliness of my reaction, but when I saw that he actually DID lock his door, I laughed even more.

Observer: Vin Zollo

Observation Date: 11/30/18

Observation Time: morning

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red Crossbill

Scientific Name: Loxia curvirostra

Comments: The Red Crossbill is so dependent upon conifer seeds it even feeds them to its young. Consequently, it can breed any time it finds a sufficiently large cone crop, even in the depths of winter. A flock of about 20 red crossbills has been repeatedly sighted at Moose Hill through the winter of 2018-2019 until at least May 21, 2019.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 4/4/21

Observation Time: 3:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill

Common Name: Red Crossbill

Scientific Name: Loxia curvirostra

Comments: I wish I could claim some special birding or photography skill but three red crossbills flew literally right over my head and into a tree a few feet above me, and then jumped over to a nearby branch to get some water. There is something to be said for being in the right place at the right time, I guess.

Red crossbills use their peculiar curved bills to break into unopened pine cones, giving them an advantage over other finch species. Because conifers produce seeds unpredictably, Red Crossbills sometimes wander (or “irrupt”) far beyond their usual range. They nest wherever and whenever they find abundant food, sometimes even in winter.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 2/9/11

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Red-bellied Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus

Comments: These birds have extended their breeding range north over the last 100 years.

More Information: All About Birds

Red-Bellied Woodpecker

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/8/14

Observation Time: 11:10 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-bellied Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus

Comments: Red-bellied woodpeckers are often victims of European starlings. As many as half of all red-bellied woodpecker nests in some areas get invaded by starlings.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Red-Bellied Woodpecker

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/13/16

Observation Time: 9:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-bellied Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus

Comments: Primarily a bird of the southeast, where its rolling calls are familiar sounds in swamps and riverside woods. Omnivorous and adaptable, this woodpecker has also adjusted to life in suburbs and city parks, and in recent years it has been expanding its range to the north. Despite the name, the faint traces of red on the belly are not often visible in the field.

Red-bellied woodpeckers are often victims of European starlings. As many as half of all red-bellied woodpecker nests in some areas get invaded by starlings.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

 

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 5/21/20

Observation Time: 6:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Red-bellied woodpecker

Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus

Comments: Massachusetts is at the northern edge of the range for this species (as implied by its scientific name, Melanerpes carolinus), but they are becoming more common around here as a result of the warming climate.

Red-bellied woodpeckers make a very distinctivekwirr call. Learn to recognize it, and you will notice them often around Sharon.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/4/24

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-bellied Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus

Comments: Primarily a bird of the southeast, where its rolling calls are familiar sounds in swamps and riverside woods. Omnivorous and adaptable, this woodpecker has also adjusted to life in suburbs and city parks, and in recent years it has been expanding its range to the north. You can see the namesake traces of red on the belly in these photos, but they are not often visible in the field.

Red-bellied woodpeckers are often victims of European starlings. As many as half of all red-bellied woodpecker nests in some areas get invaded by starlings.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/19

Observation Time: 10:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-bellied woodpecker

Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus

Comments: I kept hearing their distinctive kwirr call in a certain area, so I investigated. When I finally spotted them, I saw they were nesting in a cavity high in a dead tree.

Sharon is at the northern edge of the red-bellied woodpecker’s range. It is a year-round resident.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deborah Radovsky

Observation Date: 12/3/18

Observation Time: 9:10 a.m.

Observation Location: on trail in woods, near Sharon dog park

Common Name: Red-breasted Nuthatch

Scientific Name: Sitta canadensis

Comments: There have been flocks of these for weeks in these woods, more than I have ever observed over many years, possibly due to plentiful food sources. Note that the population of red-breasted nuthatches is shifting northward, according to the National Audubon Society. See: http://climate.audubon.org/birds/rebnut/red-breasted-nuthatch

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 2/24/13

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Red-breasted Nuthatch

Scientific Name: Sitta canadensis

Comments: Small photo due to heavy cropping.

More Information: All About Birds

Red-Breasted Nuthatch

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/6/18

Observation Time: 6:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-breasted Nuthatch

Scientific Name: Sitta canadensis

Comments: This red-breasted nuthatch was visiting the bird feeder.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/29/14

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: King Phillip’s Rock trail

Common Name: Red-eyed vireo

Scientific Name: Vireo olivaceus

Comments: Red-eyed vireos sing all day long. Their song sounds like “Here I am. Where are you?” That is fitting, as they are very hard to see in the foliage.

More Information: All About Birds

Red-Eyed Vireo

Red-Eyed Vireo

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/20

Observation Time: 1:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Red-eyed Vireo

Scientific Name: Vireo olivaceus

Comments:  Red-eyed vireos are a common summer resident in Sharon. They sing all day long. Since they are notoriously hard to spot in the canopy, the mnemonic for their song is, “Here I am. Where are you?” Hear a recording at: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-eyed_Vireo/sounds. Note that all vireo species’ songs have a similar cadence.

More Information: All About Birds

This pair of red-eyed vireos was gathering nesting materials and building a nest:

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/5/16

Observation Time: 10:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-eyed Vireo

Scientific Name: Vireo olivaceus

Comments: Red-eyed vireos are a common summer resident in Sharon. They sing all day long. Since they are notoriously hard to spot in the canopy, the mnemonic for their song is, “Here I am. Where are you?” Hear a recording at: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-eyed_Vireo/sounds

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 1/25/24

Observation Time: 11:15 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Rd.

Common Name: Red-shouldered Hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo lineatus

Comments:  I was on a phone call when this juvenile red-shouldered hawk swooped in and landed just outside my window. I grabbed my camera with my free hand and snapped this photo.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Richard Kramer

Observation Date: 2/11/19

Observation Time: 10:30 a.m.

Observation Location: west side of Lake Massapoag near the Atlantic White Cedar Swamp

Common Name: Red-shouldered Hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo lineatus

Comments: One of the best ways to find Red-shouldered Hawks is to learn their distinctive whistle. Listen for these birds in and around wet forests, where you may find them hunting from a perch along stream or pond.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Will Sweet

Observation Date: 2/18/09

Observation Time: 11:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Sharon Community Gardens

Common Name: Red-shouldered hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo lineatus

Comments: The hawk was perched in a large dead tree. It flew across the gardens many times spooking robins and starlings.

More Information: Whatbird.com: Red-shouldered Hawk

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/9/14

Observation Time: 2:40 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Red-shouldered hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo lineatus

Comments: As I sat at my desk talking on the phone, this hawk swooped in and landed on a branch outside my window. I grabbed my camera with my free hand and snapped this shot. I got help with the identification from my friend John Baur.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 4/9/18

Observation Time: evening

Observation Location: Cottage and Ames Streets

Common Name: Red-shouldered Hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo lineatus

Comments: Although the American Crow often mobs the Red-shouldered Hawk, sometimes the relationship is not so one-sided. They may chase each other and try to steal food from each other. They may also both attack a Great Horned Owl and join forces to chase the owl out of the hawk’s territory.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Andrea & Herb Daroff

Observation Date: 5/15/08

Observation Time: 11:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Pilgrim Drive

Common Name: Red-shouldered hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo lineatus

Comments: This young hawk settled in a branch not more than 20 feet from our deck. I was able to get a number of shots and since he moved around a bit before flying away, I was able to shoot from different angles. We have seen him again in the yard but never again has he perched so conveniently, so cooperatively or so close.

More Information: Whatbird.com: Red-shouldered Hawk

Red-Shouldered Hawk

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 4/3/19

Observation Time: 2:00 PM

Observation Location: Junction of E. Foxboro St. & Harding St.

Common Name: Red-tailed Hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo jamaicensis

Comments: Red-tails are big, but they only weigh a maximum of about 3 lbs. They can live up to 30 years. They feed predominantly on small mammals.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/20

Observation Time: 11:00 a.m.

Observation Location: near high-tension lines across the street from the Gavins Pond soccer fields

Common Name: Red-tailed Hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo jamaicensis

Comments: Red-tails are big, but they only weigh a maximum of about 3 lbs. They can live up to 30 years. They feed predominantly on small mammals.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/2/18

Obseration Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-tailed hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo jamaicensis

Comments: This red-tail had caught something – either a mouse or a frog. The hawk lost its grip on its prey, which dropped to the ground. The hawk immediately swooped down to the ground to retrieve its prize.

More information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/20/20

Observation Time: 4:26 p.m.

Observation Location: high tension lines opposite Ward’s Berry Farm

Common Name: Red-tailed Hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo jamaicensis

Comments: Red-tailed hawks are often harassed by songbirds. This one was engaged in a dogfight with a redwing blackbird.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/14/13

Observation Time: 7:00 a.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Red-tailed Hawk (juvenile)

Scientific Name: Buteo jamaicensis

Comments: Red-tails are big, but they only weigh a maximum of about 3 lbs. They can live up to 30 years. They feed predominantly on small mammals.

I took these photos out the kitchen window.

More Information: PBase

Observer: Deborah Radovsky

Observation Date: 12/3/18

Observation time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag, swimming very close to shore

Common Name: Red-throated Loon

Scientific Name: Gavia stellata

Comments: Adult, non-breeding plummage. Breeds in the arctic.

More information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/18/20

Observation Time: 8:45 a.m.

Observation Location: wetlands under high tension wires across the road from the Gavins Pond soccer fields

Common Name: Red-winged blackbird

Scientific Name: Agelaius phoeniceus

Comments: Red-winged blackbirds are typically found near water. Only the males have bright red epaulets on their wings

More Information: All about Birds

This is a female red-winged blackbird:

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 5/12/20

Observation Time: 6:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Red-winged blackbird (female)

Scientific Name: Agelaius phoeniceus

Comments: Red-winged blackbirds are typically found near water. The males are black with bright red epaulets on their wings. The females are dramatically different. The bird in this photo is a female.

More Information: All about Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/1/11

Observation Time: 5:10 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Redwing blackbird

Scientific Name: Agelaius phoeniceus

Comments: First redwing I’ve seen this season. The ground is blanketed in old snow and the pond is still frozen solid. In fall and winter they eat weedy seeds such as ragweed and cocklebur as well as native sunflowers and waste grains.

More Information: All about Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/15/14

Observation Time: 5:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Redwing blackbird

Scientific Name: Agelaius phoeniceus

Comments: Redwing blackbirds are typically found near water.

More Information: All about Birds

Redwing Blackbird

Redwing Blackbird

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/19/09

Observation Time: 4:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavin’s Pond

Common Name: Ring-necked Duck

Scientific Name: Aythya collaris

Comments: I saw ring-necked ducks last spring at Gavins Pond. They must use Gavins Pond to rest and feed during their migration.

More Information: All About Birds: Ring-necked Duck

Ring-Necked Duck

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/25/11

Observation Time: 5:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavin’s Pond

Common Name: Ring-necked Duck

Scientific Name: Aythya collaris

Comments: Ring-necked ducks migrate through Sharon, and can be seen in spring and fall.

More Information: All About Birds: Ring-necked Duck

Ring-Necked Duck

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/18/13

Observation Time: 2:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavin’s Pond

Common Name: Ring-necked Duck

Scientific Name: Aythya collaris

Comments: Ring-necked ducks migrate through Sharon, and can be seen in spring and fall.

More Information: All About Birds: Ring-necked Duck

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/16

Observation Time: 6:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Center

Common Name: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments: Look for these birds in forest edges and woodlands. Listen, too, for their distinctive voices. They sound like American Robins, but listen for an extra sweetness, as if the bird had operatic training; they also make a sharp chink like the squeak of a sneaker. 

More Information: All About Birds

rose-breasted grosbeak-2

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 5/18/20

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments: The male rose-breasted grosbeak is one of Sharon’s more photogenic songbirds, especially on a sunny morning. The female is drab brown. Its song has a melodic, flute-like quality. If you listen to a recording of its song and learn to recognize it, you might find one by listening.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/20/18

Observation Time: N/A

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Rose-breated Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments: Look for these birds in forest edges and woodlands. Listen, too, for their distinctive voices. They sound like American Robins, but with an extra sweetness. They also make a sharp chink like the squeak of a sneaker.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/16

Observation Time: 7:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments: The male rose-breasted grosbeak is one of our more photogenic songbirds, especially on a sunny morning. The female is drab brown.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/14

Observation Time: 11:50 a.m.

Observation Location: in the woods near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments: I found this specimen by listening to its call.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 6/25/11

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments: A female just after a bath.

More Information: All About Birds

Rose-Breasted Grosbeak

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/18/2016

Observation TIme: N/A

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments:

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 10/31/12

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Wolomolopoag Pond

Common Name: Ross’s Goose

Scientific Name: Chen rossii

Comments: Tight crop, some light dodging and burning to allow black tail to be seen a little better against the background.

More Information: All About Birds

Ross's Goose

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 11/12/12

Observation Time: 5:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Wolomolopoag Pond

Common Name: Ross’s Goose

Scientific Name: Chen rossii

Comments: The Ross’s goose resembles a snow goose, but smaller, and with a shorter neck. It is snow white with black wing tips. This individual was seen among dozens of Canada geese on their way south for the winter, and attracted a number of bird watchers to Wolomolopoag Pond.

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Ross's Goose

Ross's Goose

Ross's Goose

Ross's Goose

Ross's Goose

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/21/24

Observation Time: 8:10 am

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Scientific Name: Corthylio calendula

Comments: Ruby-crowned kinglets are tiny – even smaller than chickadees. They migrate through Sharon in spring en route to nesting areas in northern New England and Canada.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/25/24

Observation Time: 7:30 am

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Scientific Name: Corthylio calendula

Comments: Ruby-crowned kinglets are tiny – even smaller than chickadees. They migrate through Sharon in spring en route to nesting areas in northern New England and Canada.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/27/23

Observation Time: 6:45 am

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Scientific Name: Corthylio calendula

Comments: Ruby-crowned kinglets are tiny – even smaller than chickadees. They migrate through Sharon in spring en route to nesting areas in northern New England and Canada.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/15/23

Observation Time: 6:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Scientific Name: Archilochus colubris

Comments: The throat of the hummingbird in the photo looks black, but when it flew I saw a flash of bright crimson.

Ruby-throated hummingbirds are the only species of hummingbird commonly seen in New England. They overwinter in Costa Rica. When they migrate north in spring, they fly several hundred miles across the Gulf of Mexico. They arrive in Massachusetts in late April. That’s a good time to put out a hummingbird feeder. If you’re lucky, and you change the sugar water in the feeder regularly, they’ll nest nearby and visit your feeder all summer.

Hummingbirds make their nests out of lichens and spider webs. They weigh about as much as a nickel.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 5/17/23

Observation Time: 12:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Parkway

Common Name: Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Scientific Name: Archilochus colubris

Comments: The throat of the hummingbird in the photo looks black, but when it catches the sunlight it flashes bright red.

Ruby-throated hummingbirds are the only species of hummingbird commonly seen in New England. They overwinter in Costa Rica. When they migrate north in spring, they fly several hundred miles across the Gulf of Mexico. They arrive in Massachusetts in late April. That’s a good time to put out a hummingbird feeder. If you’re lucky, and you change the sugar water in the feeder regularly, they’ll nest nearby and visit your feeder all summer.

Hummingbirds make their nests out of lichens and spider webs. They weigh about as much as a nickel.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/18/16

Observation TIme: N/A

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Scientific Name: Archilochus colubris

Comments: Ruby-throated hummingbirds are the only species of hummingbird commonly seen in New England. They overwinter in Costa Rica, and arrive in Massachusetts around May 1 every year. That’s a good time to put out a hummingbird feeder. If you’re lucky, and you change the sugar water in the feeder regularly, they’ll nest nearby and visit your feeder all summer.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/16/14

Observation Time: 6:45 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Rd.

Common Name: Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Scientific Name: Archilochus colubris

Comments: Ruby-throated hummingbirds migrate all the way from New England to Central America and back every year – a journey of about 2,500 miles including 500 miles over the Gulf of Mexico. They can live up to 10 years, so they log a lot of miles for a creature that weighs less than a dime.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 6/25/11

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Scientific Name: Archilochus colubris

Comments: Female (sticking out her long tongue, which is adapted to probing for nectar in flower blossoms)

More Information: All About Birds

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/3/21

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Rd.

Common Name: Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Scientific Name: Archilochus colubris

Comments: Ruby-throated hummingbirds are the only species of hummingbird commonly seen in New England. They overwinter in Costa Rica. When they migrate north in spring, they fly several hundred miles across the Gulf of Mexico. They arrive in Massachusetts in late April. That’s a good time to put out a hummingbird feeder. If you’re lucky, and you change the sugar water in the feeder regularly, they’ll nest nearby and visit your feeder all summer. They make their nests out of lichens and spider webs. They weigh about as much as a nickel.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/21/16

Observation Time: 7:10 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (The Trustees of Reservations)

Common Name: Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Scientific Name: Archilochus colubris

Comments: Ruby-throated hummingbirds are the only species of hummingbird commonly seen in New England. They overwinter in Costa Rica, and arrive in Massachusetts around May 1 every year. That’s a good time to put out a hummingbird feeder. If you’re lucky, and you change the sugar water in the feeder regularly, they’ll nest nearby and visit your feeder all summer.

More Information: All About Birds

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/11/23

Observation Time: 9:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Rd.

Common Name: Ruby-throated Hummingbird (female)

Scientific Name: Archilochus colubris

Comments: Our hummingbird feeder, located right outside our kitchen window, provides close-up views of these fascinating creatures from late April through mid-September. All we have to do is clean the feeder and change the sugar water (1/4 cup of sugar per cup of water) every four or five days.

With a little patience, hummingbirds can even be trained to feed from your hand using a small hand-held feeder.

If hummingbirds find the feeder when they arrive in spring, they’ll nest nearby, weaving their teacup-size nests from lichens and spider webs. Their two white eggs are the size of jelly beans.

Ruby-throated hummingbirds are the only species of hummingbird commonly seen in New England. They overwinter in Costa Rica. When they migrate north in spring, they fly several hundred miles across the Gulf of Mexico.

Hummingbirds make their nests out of lichens and spider webs. They weigh about as much as a nickel.

These photos were taken on a sunny morning with a shutter speed of 1/5,000th of a second.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 1/1/14

Observation Time: 4:42 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Rusty Blackbird

Scientific Name: Euphagus carolinus

Comments: Low light, hand-held, not such a great photo. Confirmed by Christine Turnbull as a Rusty.

More Information: All About Birds

Rusty Blackbird

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/28/24

Observation Time: 9:15 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Savannah Sparrow

Scientific Name: Passerculus sandwichensis

Comments: Savannah sparrows have distinctive yellow eyebrows.

More Information: All About Birds